Mar
5

Cloud computing, smartphones intertwined

Cloud computing, smartphones intertwined

March 5
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The popularity of mobile devices in the enterprise continues to expand as more staff members use their tablets, laptops and smartphones for work-related purposes. The advent of cloud computing solutions has also made it possible for employees to use these products to access corporate documents anywhere with an internet connection.

A recent CloudTweaks report by Pete Knight highlighted the significance of smartphones and cloud computing. The writer explained that smartphones are not just devices with which to make phone calls, but rather products used to access the internet. Although desktops and laptops will continue to be the preferred devices to tap into the web, but “the scales are rapidly turning.” In fact, some areas with internet connectivity are already dominated by the smaller gadgets.

Smartphones, however, are not as capable as laptops and desktops when it comes to storage capacity. Knight indicated that smartphones have made significant strides in this area, especially with the use of micro-SD cards. This is where the cloud comes into play as well. More users are using hosted environments for their online storage needs.

Cloud, mobility leading charge toward Third Platform

The connection between cloud computing and mobile devices is expected to continue in the near future, according to a report by market research firm IDC. In addition to these sectors, big data and social technologies will also drive the transition toward the Third Platform, as well as helping global IT spending levels reach more than $2.1 trillion in 2013, increasing nearly 6 percent from last year.

IDC said that the mobile sector, which includes smartphones, eReaders and tablets, will account for nearly 60 percent of the industry’s growth in 2012.

Frank Gens, senior vice president and chief analyst at IDC, said that social, mobile, big data and cloud computing will be responsible for roughly 90 percent of the IT industry’s growth between 2013 and 2020. Gens asserted that businesses must find ways to leverage these technologies moving forward.

“Companies that are not putting 80 percent or more of their competitive energy into this new market will be trapped in the legacy portion of the market, growing even slower than global GDP,” Gens said.

Cloud computing and smartphones may be still relatively new phenomena but their impact has been immense up to this point. Both trends will likely continue to impact the global IT landscape like few solutions have before.

Photo Credit: William Hook via Compfight cc